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Work Plans & Strategic Plan

MAPC

Promoting Smart Growth & Regional Planning

New Strategic Plan Adopted

The MAPC Council today adopted a new strategic plan for the agency that will guide its work for the next three to five years.

The plan outlines four strategic priorities:

  1. Encourage development and preservation consistent with smart growth principles, especially by increasing housing production, promoting innovative transportation solutions, and encouraging mixed-use development near various forms of transit.
  2. Partner with our cities and towns to promote regional collaboration, enhance effectiveness, and increase efficiency.
  3. Play a leading role in helping the region to achieve greater equity.
  4. Help the region reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the physical, environmental, and social impacts of climate change and natural hazards.

Also, read our organizational assessment with MAPC comments developed during our strategic planning process.

Read MAPC's Annual Report for more details on recent projects and accomplishments.

The plan identifies core approaches, too, that MAPC will use to guide its work:

  • interdisciplinary practice;
  • regional perspective and impact;
  • data and research;
  • convening;
  • partnerships;
  • civic engagement;
  • innovation and creativity;
  • advocacy; and
  • achieving results

MAPC initiated the planning process early in 2014 and also undertook an organizational assessment to inform its plan. Both activities were funded by a generous grant from the Barr Foundation and with MAPC resources.

January

February

Map showing change in median sale price of single family homes and condominims from 2009 to 2016 in the MAPC region. Price escalation is largely concentrated within Route 128. Nearly every municipality in the region's Inner Core saw prices rise by more than $100,000. Six municipalities have seen median sales prices decline since 2009.

March
Map showing greenhouse gas emissions from residential buildings in the MAPC region. The average single-family detached house consumes more than twice the energy as an average apartment in a large multifamily building. As such, cities with more high-density housing boast a lower per-household carbon footprint.
April 

Map showing home purchases by race and ethnicity in the MAPC region. The data reveal that successful residential mortgage applications for Black and Latino applicants are concentrated in limited areas. In the MAPC region, Boston, Randolph, and Lynn account for 50% of total home-purchase loans to Black borrowers, while Lynn, Boston, Revere, Chelsea, Everett, and Framingham account for 53% of home-purchase loans to Latino borrowers.

 

May  Various charts showing changes in the MAPC region since the adoption of MetroFuture in 2008. Metro Boston has added 254,000 residents, 253,000 jobs, and 26,000 businesses, but challenges still face the region. Unemployment rates are still higher for residents of color, the cost of owning a home has risen by 17%, 71% of MBTA buses and trains are beyond useful life, $7.3 billion is needed for MBTA system repairs, and there is worsening income inequality.
June

Map showing tree coverage in Boston, Braintree, Brookline, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Quincy, Revere, Somerville, and Winthrop. While some cities, towns, and neighborhoods have extensive canopy, others have very little.

July 

Map showing youth asthma hospitalizations in the MAPC region. In the MAPC region, emergency hospitalizations due to asthma happened at a rate of 230 per 100,000 youth from 2008 through 2012. This marked an increase of 22 hospitalizations per 100,000 youth compared to 2003 through 2007, an uptick driven by significant increases in Black and Latino youth rates.

AUGUST

Map shows the annual chance of flooding after 3.4 feet of sea level rise, the projection for 2070. Many coastal areas and river basins have 25% chance of flooding annually.

SEPTEMBER

Map showing municipal reliance on the property tax in the MAPC region. Eleven towns got 80-90% of their municipal revenue from property taxes in fiscal year 2017.

OCTOBER

Green municipal aggregation is gaining momentum in Massachusetts. Municipal aggregation provides competitive prices, prices stability, and includes more renewable energy from new sources located on the New England grid. The impact of active and authorized aggregations could result in the construction of more than 50 one-megawatt turbines. With municipal aggregation, you city or town selects your electricity supply instead of your utility provider, so your community can choose how much renewable energy is included and where it comes from.

NOVEMBER

Map showing the percentage point change in share of residents of color from 2000 to 2010. In the whole region, the change was plus 6.3%.

DECEMBER

Map showing the "Village Screen" ranking for cities and towns in the MAPC region. The ranking measures every Census Block based on key characteristics such as number of businesses, street connectivity, walk score, population density, employment, building density, and distance to that municipality's city or town hall.

January MAPC Calendar 2017: Map of employment change in the MAPC region frmo 2009 to 2015.
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February MAPC Calendar 2017: Map of gas leaks in the MAPC region December 2015
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