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How Do We Fix Congestion Around Sullivan Square?

The time has come to tackle the transportation crisis in Sullivan Square and its vicinity. Morning rush hour Orange Line ridership exceeds capacity between Sullivan Square and State Street. For four hours every weekday morning, the average speed on I-93 southbound from Medford to Charlestown is less than 22 miles per hour. And the area […]

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Community Safety Day Advocates for Funding to Combat Violence

On Tuesday, March 12, local officials, mayors and city managers, community leaders, law enforcement officers, and youth gathered at the State House for Community Safety Day on the Hill. Speakers addressed a standing room-only crowd to discuss effective ways of combating youth and gang violence, to educate attendees about the importance of supporting youth violence […]

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PHOTOS: MetroCommon 2050 Listening Session in Boston

Join Us At our Next Listening Session! Norwell, Mass. | Thursday, March 21 | Drop-in 3-8 p.m. Learn More PHOTOS: MetroCommon 2050 Listening Session in Boston Over 100 people voiced their ideas for their future of our region and Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh gave a keynote address at a MetroCommon 2050 Listening Session last […]

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Apply Today: MetroCommon 2050 Community Engagement Advisory Committee

[Update: Monday, March 4]: The deadline to apply has been extended to Friday, March 15 Interested in working with diverse groups of people to help plan for the future of the Greater Boston region? Love community engagement, social media, networking, urban planning, or all of the above? Are you interested in helping marginalized or underserved […]

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Getting to Net Zero: How Your Municipality Can Help Improve the Building Code

The building sector is the second-largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Massachusetts. With increasing awareness of the negative health impacts of inefficient buildings and carbon emissions, many municipalities have identified GHG emissions in buildings as an issue that they would like to address more fully within their communities. While cities and towns can […]

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Q&A with Hortense Gerardo, MAPC’s New Artist-in-Residence

  Hortense Gerardo is a practicing playwright, movement artist, screenwriter, and professor of anthropology and performing arts who joined MAPC as an artist-in-residence in late 2018. As an artist-in-residence, Gerardo will promote creative placemaking and community resilience through art and help bring art and creative thinking to projects across departments. Give us an idea of […]

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MAPC’s 2019-2020 Legislative Priorities

The deadline to file bills for the 2019-2020 Massachusetts legislative session was Friday, Jan. 19. Over 5,000 bills were filed before that date – including several smart growth priorities from MAPC. Our proposals were crafted to address the transportation, climate, and housing challenges in the 101 cities and towns of our region. If enacted, these […]

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Arts & Culture Staff Join Legislative Leadership at Cultural Caucus Kick-Off

Staff from MAPC’s Arts and Culture division joined five other organizations on Wednesday, Jan. 16 to help the Massachusetts Legislature’s Cultural Caucus kick off its efforts for this legislative session. Caucus chairs Sen. Julian Cyr and Rep. Mary Keefe and vice-chairs Sen. Adam Hinds and Rep. Sarah Peake invited MAPC, along with the Mass Cultural […]

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MAPC Wins Planning Awards

Last week, the Massachusetts Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA-MA) presented MAPC with two awards: the Social Advocacy Award for and the Metropolitan Mayors’ Coalition Regional Housing Task Force and the Outstanding Planning Project Award for MassBuilds, a visual database of development in the Greater Boston region. Earlier this month, MAPC’s Clean Energy team […]

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Roadworks: A Streamlined Digital Platform to Manage Street Openings

Massachusetts has some of the oldest natural gas main infrastructure in the nation, with pipes averaging 60 years old. To replace this pipe and other underground infrastructure, utilities need to navigate a patchwork of paper permits to dig up roads across the state. But they’re not the only crews working on our roads – the […]

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