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Plan for Municipal Retrofit Projects

Energy retrofit projects can have multiple benefits for municipalities in addition to resiliency preparation and climate change mitigation, including operational cost savings, reduced maintenance, and greater comfort. However, large retrofits in particular require significant oversight in order to identify the most effective projects to prioritize and the resources and timeframe needed to complete them. This […]

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Massachusetts Renewable Portfolio Standard

Electricity suppliers in the New England grid generate primarily from fossil fuel and nuclear power resources. However, electricity produced from renewable sources is beginning to gain clout in the market. In Massachusetts, utilities are subject to a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) that requires them to supply a certain percentage of their electricity from renewable or […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Net Metering

In addition to energy generated by large facilities, Massachusetts also allows excess energy generated by small-scale, distributed systems to be purchased by utilities (for up to 3% of their peak load) and fed back into the grid. This is known as “net metering.” When the system owner is consuming energy, their electricity meter spins forward. […]

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Launch Community-wide Solar & Efficiency Campaign

For municipalities that want to encourage residents to think comprehensively about their energy use, it makes sense to bundle both efficiency and solar outreach into one program in which residents are encouraged to get a energy assessment at the same time as a solar site assessment. A community collective purchasing model can be used to bundle […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Local Green Business Program

The purpose of a Green Business Program is twofold: to acknowledge the clean energy efforts and energy savings of the business community; and, to encourage local businesses to take advantage of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities, such as MassSave. As part of the program, neighboring businesses or business sectors can compete to showcase their […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Landfill Gas Energy

When the biological waste inside landfills becomes trapped without exposure to air, it undergoes anaerobic decomposition and produces organic compounds, such as methane (CH4). Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States. Although methane is a potent greenhouse gas, it is also one of the primary fuels used to generate […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Hydropower

Hydroelectric power is generated by capturing the kinetic energy or motion in free-flowing or falling water, waves, currents or tides, and converting it into electric current. The Massachusetts Class I Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) differentiates between hydroelectric power, which captures energy from flowing freshwater with or without the use of a dam structure; ocean thermal, wave or tidal energy, which […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Hire a Shared Energy Manager

Capacity issues—whether funding or staff time—can be a recurring obstacle for local clean energy efforts. The additional responsibilities and specialized knowledge necessary to pursue such efforts can be overwhelming for busy facilities managers or town administrators. However, it can also be hard for cities and towns to justify hiring a full-time staff person devoted to energy, […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Geothermal Energy

Geothermal energy technology captures heat energy stored in the Earth’s crust and converts it into electric or heat energy. Geothermal resources can be tapped at multiple depths, ranging from low-temperatures in the shallow ground to hot rock and water found several miles below the surface of the Earth, to molten rock (magma) found even deeper. […]

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Clean Energy Toolkit Topic: Fuel Cells

Electrochemical fuel cells convert fuel directly into electric current by triggering a chemical reaction between the fuel and an oxidant using an electrolyte. So long as the fuel (reactant) and oxidant are constantly replenished, fuel cells can generate current indefinitely, in contrast to a conventional battery, which is a closed system with finite amounts of […]

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